paranoidpolariod:

thoselonelyeyes:

fullmoon-unicorn:

the starry sky on the himalayas

CLICK ON THE PIC BRO

definitely click the pic!

paranoidpolariod:

thoselonelyeyes:

fullmoon-unicorn:

the starry sky on the himalayas

CLICK ON THE PIC BRO

definitely click the pic!

(Source: fullmoonwolves, via nogwad)

crazeist:

youbetter-runlike-thedevil:

beatspm:


This was taken in Australia. Three separate things happening at once: On the left, fireworks exploded as part of Australia Day celebrations. In the middle, it’s Comet McNaught. Then on the right, there’s lightning from a thunderstorm far away.

i dont care if this has nothing to do with the blog its just sick

on ya ‘straya

oh my god this is so cool

crazeist:

youbetter-runlike-thedevil:

beatspm:

This was taken in Australia. Three separate things happening at once: On the left, fireworks exploded as part of Australia Day celebrations. In the middle, it’s Comet McNaught. Then on the right, there’s lightning from a thunderstorm far away.

i dont care if this has nothing to do with the blog its just sick

on ya ‘straya

oh my god this is so cool

(Source: your-daily-dose, via timelordy-teganbreann)

princesssugarbutt:

So yeah I can see how many fingers you’re holding up

(Source: fullheartedly, via timelordy-teganbreann)

zedrin-stormshock:

nunsnroses:

nijuukoo:

Art by Cyril Rolando

I feel like this really expresses each instrument.

Hey no joke

this guy has some of the best tutorials on various aspects of art (including color!)

Check him out, seriously.

(Source: cross-connect, via todare)

palmcurrents:

☼Summer // Tropical☼

(Source: invocado, via antiterra)

thejesusandmarxchain:

wehidebehindstars:

elleduzitwell:

DO NOT SCROLL PASS. THIS IS YOUR DAUGHTER, YOUR SISTER, YOUR FRIEND. PLEASE HELP TO BRING #relisha #rudd BACK HOME SAFE AND SOUND.

Y’all, this case is like 3000% legit. It’s been all over the news in my area and the search for her has turned into a search for her body. The man who took her is also wanted for the murder of his own wife.  

Those are both true, links here and here
Relisha is the 3rd girl to go missing in the our area in the past month. She is thought to be with Kahlil Malik Tatum, a janitor at her school, who is thought to be driving either of the cars stated in the above flyer. Please signal boost this, the DC Police may have started to give up hope, but there still may be a chance for Relisha Rudds.

thejesusandmarxchain:

wehidebehindstars:

elleduzitwell:

DO NOT SCROLL PASS. THIS IS YOUR DAUGHTER, YOUR SISTER, YOUR FRIEND. PLEASE HELP TO BRING #relisha #rudd BACK HOME SAFE AND SOUND.

Y’all, this case is like 3000% legit. It’s been all over the news in my area and the search for her has turned into a search for her body. The man who took her is also wanted for the murder of his own wife.  

Those are both true, links here and here

Relisha is the 3rd girl to go missing in the our area in the past month. She is thought to be with Kahlil Malik Tatum, a janitor at her school, who is thought to be driving either of the cars stated in the above flyer.

Please signal boost this, the DC Police may have started to give up hope, but there still may be a chance for Relisha Rudds.

(via timelordy-teganbreann)

tempohouse:

O. E. Pol, Illustration of initial primes
dunwall:

this is my favourite quote ever

dunwall:

this is my favourite quote ever

(Source: an-ideal-of-hope, via moosopp)

dutchster:

onlylolgifs:

These snails are zombies. They have been hijacked by a parasite that controls their brains and movements.

what the fuck (video)

(via nogwad)

jtotheizzoe:

Eat Your Tardigrades or You Don’t Get Dessert!
You know this little guy, right? It’s the mighty tardigrade, as featured in the new Cosmos. Tardigrades, also known as water bears, also known as FREAKIN’ MOSS PIGLETS, are microscopic eight-legged animals that can withstand temperatures from near absolute zero to boiling water, absorb extreme doses of radiation, go without food or water for ten years, and even survive the vacuum of space. They can even be completely dried out and ride on the wind to a new home, where they rehydrate and go about their tardibusiness. Tardigrade rain, folks.
In other words, they are BAMFs (bad-ass microfauna).
Oh, and you’ve probably eaten them. Thanks to Meg Lowman, I found out that these water-dwelling super-critters live not only on wild mosses and wet plants, but on grocery store produce like lettuce and spinach. Do you think that a mere rinse or shake under the faucet (or even cooking) is enough to dislodge a radiation-eating space pig? Ha! Not by a long shot, according to Lowman.
So yeah… trying to go strictly vegetarian? You’ve almost certainly eaten some tardigrades. Sorry. Don’t worry, though. They’re totally harmless. I like to imagine that when I eat them, I absorb their power, and become a little bit mightier.
New motto: For strength, eat your vegetables and eat your tardigrades.
Meg Lowman has more about your local tardigrade friends. Also check out Lowman’s awesome research project that helps wheelchair-bound students climb to the top of the forest canopy where they help study tardigrade biodiversity. Science is for everyone!

jtotheizzoe:

Eat Your Tardigrades or You Don’t Get Dessert!

You know this little guy, right? It’s the mighty tardigrade, as featured in the new Cosmos. Tardigrades, also known as water bears, also known as FREAKIN’ MOSS PIGLETS, are microscopic eight-legged animals that can withstand temperatures from near absolute zero to boiling water, absorb extreme doses of radiation, go without food or water for ten years, and even survive the vacuum of space. They can even be completely dried out and ride on the wind to a new home, where they rehydrate and go about their tardibusiness. Tardigrade rain, folks.

In other words, they are BAMFs (bad-ass microfauna).

Oh, and you’ve probably eaten them. Thanks to Meg Lowman, I found out that these water-dwelling super-critters live not only on wild mosses and wet plants, but on grocery store produce like lettuce and spinach. Do you think that a mere rinse or shake under the faucet (or even cooking) is enough to dislodge a radiation-eating space pig? Ha! Not by a long shot, according to Lowman.

So yeah… trying to go strictly vegetarian? You’ve almost certainly eaten some tardigrades. Sorry. Don’t worry, though. They’re totally harmless. I like to imagine that when I eat them, I absorb their power, and become a little bit mightier.

New motto: For strength, eat your vegetables and eat your tardigrades.

Meg Lowman has more about your local tardigrade friends. Also check out Lowman’s awesome research project that helps wheelchair-bound students climb to the top of the forest canopy where they help study tardigrade biodiversity. Science is for everyone!

(via planetscience)

neurosciencestuff:

Nanopores underlie our ability to tune in to a single voice
Inner-ear membrane uses tiny pores to mechanically separate sounds, researchers find.
Even in a crowded room full of background noise, the human ear is remarkably adept at tuning in to a single voice — a feat that has proved remarkably difficult for computers to match. A new analysis of the underlying mechanisms, conducted by researchers at MIT, has provided insights that could ultimately lead to better machine hearing, and perhaps to better hearing aids as well.
Our ears’ selectivity, it turns out, arises from evolution’s precise tuning of a tiny membrane, inside the inner ear, called the tectorial membrane. The viscosity of this membrane — its firmness, or lack thereof — depends on the size and distribution of tiny pores, just a few tens of nanometers wide. This, in turn, provides mechanical filtering that helps to sort out specific sounds.
The new findings are reported in the Biophysical Journal by a team led by MIT graduate student Jonathan Sellon, and including research scientist Roozbeh Ghaffari, former graduate student Shirin Farrahi, and professor of electrical engineering Dennis Freeman. The team collaborated with biologist Guy Richardson of the University of Sussex.
Elusive understanding
In discriminating among competing sounds, the human ear is “extraordinary compared to conventional speech- and sound-recognition technologies,” Freeman says. The exact reasons have remained elusive — but the importance of the tectorial membrane, located inside the cochlea, or inner ear, has become clear in recent years, largely through the work of Freeman and his colleagues. Now it seems that a flawed assumption contributed to the longstanding difficulty in understanding the importance of this membrane.
Much of our ability to differentiate among sounds is frequency-based, Freeman says — so researchers had “assumed that the better we could resolve frequency, the better we could hear.” But this assumption turns out not always to be true.
In fact, Freeman and his co-authors previously found that tectorial membranes with a certain genetic defect are actually highly sensitive to variations in frequency — and the result is worse hearing, not better.
The MIT team found “a fundamental tradeoff between how well you can resolve different frequencies and how long it takes to do it,” Freeman explains. That makes the finer frequency discrimination too slow to be useful in real-world sound selectivity.
Too fast for neurons
Previous work by Freeman and colleagues has shown that the tectorial membrane plays a fundamental role in sound discrimination by carrying waves that stimulate a particular kind of sensory receptor. This process is essential in deciphering competing sounds, but it takes place too quickly for neural processes to keep pace. Nature, over the course of evolution, appears to have produced a very effective electromechanical system, Freeman says, that can keep up with the speed of these sound waves.
The new work explains how the membrane’s structure determines how well it filters sound. The team studied two genetic variants that cause nanopores within the tectorial membrane to be smaller or larger than normal. The pore size affects the viscosity of the membrane and its sensitivity to different frequencies.
The tectorial membrane is spongelike, riddled with tiny pores. By studying how its viscosity varies with pore size, the team was able to determine that the typical pore size observed in mice — about 40 nanometers across — represents an optimal size for combining frequency discrimination with overall sensitivity. Pores that are larger or smaller impair hearing.
“It really changes the way we think about this structure,” Ghaffari says. The new findings show that fluid viscosity and pores are actually essential to its performance. Changing the sizes of tectorial membrane nanopores, via biochemical manipulation or other means, can provide unique ways to alter hearing sensitivity and frequency discrimination.
William Brownell, a professor of otolaryngology at Baylor College of Medicine, says, “This is the first study to suggest that porosity may affect cochlear tuning.” This work, he adds, “could provide insight” into the development of specific hearing problems.

neurosciencestuff:

Nanopores underlie our ability to tune in to a single voice

Inner-ear membrane uses tiny pores to mechanically separate sounds, researchers find.

Even in a crowded room full of background noise, the human ear is remarkably adept at tuning in to a single voice — a feat that has proved remarkably difficult for computers to match. A new analysis of the underlying mechanisms, conducted by researchers at MIT, has provided insights that could ultimately lead to better machine hearing, and perhaps to better hearing aids as well.

Our ears’ selectivity, it turns out, arises from evolution’s precise tuning of a tiny membrane, inside the inner ear, called the tectorial membrane. The viscosity of this membrane — its firmness, or lack thereof — depends on the size and distribution of tiny pores, just a few tens of nanometers wide. This, in turn, provides mechanical filtering that helps to sort out specific sounds.

The new findings are reported in the Biophysical Journal by a team led by MIT graduate student Jonathan Sellon, and including research scientist Roozbeh Ghaffari, former graduate student Shirin Farrahi, and professor of electrical engineering Dennis Freeman. The team collaborated with biologist Guy Richardson of the University of Sussex.

Elusive understanding

In discriminating among competing sounds, the human ear is “extraordinary compared to conventional speech- and sound-recognition technologies,” Freeman says. The exact reasons have remained elusive — but the importance of the tectorial membrane, located inside the cochlea, or inner ear, has become clear in recent years, largely through the work of Freeman and his colleagues. Now it seems that a flawed assumption contributed to the longstanding difficulty in understanding the importance of this membrane.

Much of our ability to differentiate among sounds is frequency-based, Freeman says — so researchers had “assumed that the better we could resolve frequency, the better we could hear.” But this assumption turns out not always to be true.

In fact, Freeman and his co-authors previously found that tectorial membranes with a certain genetic defect are actually highly sensitive to variations in frequency — and the result is worse hearing, not better.

The MIT team found “a fundamental tradeoff between how well you can resolve different frequencies and how long it takes to do it,” Freeman explains. That makes the finer frequency discrimination too slow to be useful in real-world sound selectivity.

Too fast for neurons

Previous work by Freeman and colleagues has shown that the tectorial membrane plays a fundamental role in sound discrimination by carrying waves that stimulate a particular kind of sensory receptor. This process is essential in deciphering competing sounds, but it takes place too quickly for neural processes to keep pace. Nature, over the course of evolution, appears to have produced a very effective electromechanical system, Freeman says, that can keep up with the speed of these sound waves.

The new work explains how the membrane’s structure determines how well it filters sound. The team studied two genetic variants that cause nanopores within the tectorial membrane to be smaller or larger than normal. The pore size affects the viscosity of the membrane and its sensitivity to different frequencies.

The tectorial membrane is spongelike, riddled with tiny pores. By studying how its viscosity varies with pore size, the team was able to determine that the typical pore size observed in mice — about 40 nanometers across — represents an optimal size for combining frequency discrimination with overall sensitivity. Pores that are larger or smaller impair hearing.

“It really changes the way we think about this structure,” Ghaffari says. The new findings show that fluid viscosity and pores are actually essential to its performance. Changing the sizes of tectorial membrane nanopores, via biochemical manipulation or other means, can provide unique ways to alter hearing sensitivity and frequency discrimination.

William Brownell, a professor of otolaryngology at Baylor College of Medicine, says, “This is the first study to suggest that porosity may affect cochlear tuning.” This work, he adds, “could provide insight” into the development of specific hearing problems.

(via planetscience)

kiliofdurinsline:

Today, we are cancelling the apocalypse.

(via chernoalphapilot)